FEATURED LETTERS

The Letters of 1916 is delighted to introduce a new component of the project, ‘Featured Letters’. This aspect of the project offers an opportunity for team members and collaborators to contextualise some of the letters in the collection by providing biographical and historical background to the letter or suite of letters, by ‘reading between the lines’, as it were, to further enrich the rich tapestry that is the Letters of 1916.

If you would like to contribute to the project or would like to contribute an article to the Featured Letter page, project, please email letters1916@gmail.com to discuss.


Featured Letter on Soundcloud:

Letter from Emma Duffin to Maria Duffin, 5 February 1916 (Duffin Papers)


Featured Letter on Soundcloud:

Letter from Alfred Gerald Crofton to Lady Clonbrock, 13 December 1915 (National Library of Ireland)


Featured Letter by Edward Kearns:

Letter from John Quinn to George Gavan Duffy, 9 September 1916 (University College Dublin Archives)

Letter from John Quinn to George Gavan Duffy, 9 September 1916 (University College Dublin Archives)
Letter from John Quinn to George Gavan Duffy, 9 September 1916 (University College Dublin Archives)

The feature focuses on a letter written by John Quinn, on 9 September 1916, and sent across the Atlantic to his fellow lawyer George Gavan Duffy. A copy of the letter has found its way into the Letters of 1916 collection, and it serves as a fascinating portal to its time, and in particular to the context of Roger Casement’s execution.

Read more here.

 

 

 

 


 Featured Letter by Louise Tobin:

Letter from Edward O’Farrell to the Controller, Foreign Trade Department, 29 February 1916 (National Archives of Ireland).

Dublin police report on the illegal importation of glass from Belgium by a Mr. H. Wigoder in Feb. 1916 | Image: National Archives of Ireland
Dublin police report on the illegal importation of glass from Belgium by a Mr. H. Wigoder in Feb. 1916 | Image: National Archives of Ireland

This feature deals with a letter which highlights the problems faced by Irish businesses during these turbulent times. The letter in question is from Sir Edward O’Farrell, the assistant under-secretary for Ireland, to the Controller of the British Foreign Trade Department in London. O’Farrell encloses a report by a sergeant at ‘G’ Division, the detective branch of the Dublin Metropolitan Police, which deals with the illegal importation of glass from Belgium by a Mr. H. Wigoder in Feb. 1916.

Read more here.

 

 

 

 

 


Featured Letter by Sean Driver:

Letter from Joseph Michael Stanley to George Bernard Shaw, 28 March 1916 (Military Archives of Ireland).

Letter from Joseph Michael Stanley to George Bernard Shaw, 28 March 1916 | Image: Military Archives of Ireland
Letter from Joseph Michael Stanley to George Bernard Shaw, 28 March 1916 | Image: Military Archives of Ireland

The feature deals with a letter which was written by Joseph Michael Stanley to George Bernard Shaw, dated 28 March 1916.  The letter details a sequence of events commencing with the raid of the offices of the Gaelic Press on Friday the 24th of March.   The raid and seizure described occur less than a month before the Easter Rising and show that the authorities were undertaking a concerted attempt to break up the small presses.

Read more here.

 

 

 


Featured Letter by Dr Brian Hughes:

Letter from Alfred Crofton to Lady Clonbrock, 1 October 1916 (National Library of Ireland)

Letter from Alfred Gerald Crofton to Lady Clonbrock, 1 October 1916 | Image: National Library of Ireland
Letter from Alfred Gerald Crofton to Lady Clonbrock, 1 October 1916 | Image: National Library of Ireland

Over 210,000 Irish men, all volunteers, served in the British armed forces during the Great War. This letter is an important part of the story of the contribution of the Irish diaspora to the Great War and serves as a reminder of the varied and complex nature of Irish involvement in that war.  Alfred Crofton enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) on 10 December 1915. 

Read more here.

 


Featured Letter by Dr Brian Hughes:

Letter from James Stephens to John MacDonagh, 24 August 1916 (National Library of Ireland)

Letter from James Stephens to John MacDonagh, 24 August 1916 | Image: National Library of Ireland
Letter from James Stephens to John MacDonagh, 24 August 1916 | Image: National Library of Ireland

On 3 May 1916, Thomas MacDonagh was executed by firing squad in Kilmainham Gaol in Dublin. Born in Cloughjordan, County Tipperary, in 1878, MacDonagh was a teacher, poet and writer. By 1916, he was a member of the secret revolutionary organisation responsible for the planning of the Easter Rising.

Read more here.